Museum of California Design • Design Events
Design Events


Museum of California Design navigation






Judith Hendler (b. 1942), American
"Lemon Drops" necklace
Acri-Gems Inc., Circa 1984
Glass-coated airplane windshield acrylic
19 ¾ x 7 ½ in.
Photo: Mario Almarez

What's So California About California Design?

A talk by Bill Stern
Executive Director, Museum of California Design


Monday, May 14, 2012


Brown Auditorium
LACMA
5905 Wilshire Blvd.


Bill Stern, who served as consulting curator for California Design, 1930–1965: "Living in a Modern Way," at LACMA through June 3, will discuss how local materials, war industries, and a burgeoning population conspired to make California — America's cultural frontier — a preeminent source of new products and new looks for the entire nation. He will demonstrate how distinctively California circumstances, including a gold rush, an earthquake, a depression and a world war, combined with the state's unique confluence of cultural influences — Spanish Colonial, Spanish-Moorish, Mexican, European, Chinese and Japanese — to inspire an astonishing surge of design innovation.

Stern's next exhibition for the Museum of California Design, California's Designing Women, 1896-1986, opens at The Autry in Griffith Park on August 10, 2012.

Elizabeth Eaton Burton (1869-1937), American
Table lamp
Circa 1910
Copper and shell, 15 ½ x 8 ½ x 9 ¼ in.
Photo: 1910metal.com

Shape: Lewis Ipsen;
Glazes: Victor Hauser
Refrigerator leftover stack
J.A. Bauer Pottery Co., Circa 1932
Earthenware, 7 3/4 x 6 in.
Photo: Peter Brenner



Greta Magnusson Grossman (1906-1999), American, born in Sweden
Floor lamp, "Grasshopper"
Grossman for Bergboms, Sweden, Circa 1952 Metal, 55 x 11 1/2 x 17 in.
Photo: Write Auctions
Hobart "Hobie" Alter (b. 1933), American
Surfboard
1961
Polyurethane foam, redwood, glue, fiberglass cloth, polyester resin, 118 x 22 x 11 in.
Photo: LACMA


Go to: www.LACMA.org









MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA DESIGN DIRECTOR BILL STERN
on the significance of PACIFIC STANDARD TIME:



In SAN DIEGO'S CRAFT REVOLUTION:
Svetozar Radakovich in collaboration with Carl
Ekstrom, Double Door, ca. 1967, polyurethane foam,
fiberglass and wood with resin.
Photograph: Lynn Fayman

What They Can’t See From 9th Ave.: Livin’ on Pacific Standard Time

by Bill Stern, published on www.culturalweekly.com

Calling the Getty-sponsored Pacific Standard Time art and design initiative “overcompensation” and citing a source calling it “boosterish” (as the New York Times did recently) is a gasp of the shop-worn Gotham provinciality mocked so brilliantly by Saul Steinberg in his “View of the World from 9th Avenue.” It is a canard that I thought had breathed its last when the New York Times, my hometown paper, sent the astute Bernard Weinraub to Los Angeles to report on us two decades ago.

Since I came to Los Angeles more than a quarter of a century ago I have known Angelenos who were guilty of the flip side of boosterism: the equally provincial view that everything is better somewhere else: i.e., you have to go to New York for “real” art. (For New Yorkers it used to be Paris.) Mega-populous New York has, of course, long been justly celebrated for its art and its architecture (well, its skyscrapers anyway), a reputation facilitated by its role as the publishing and periodical capital of the country.

Los Angeles, however, matured into the economic and cultural capital of the United States west of the Hudson River so quickly and so recently that it is frequently misperceived as having no past, even by some of its own residents. Although the city has by now developed a healthy sense of itself, it took Pacific Standard Time to engender serious self-reflection of the city’s largely uncelebrated cultural heritage.

It was thanks to Pacific Standard Time that LACMA’s California Design 1930-1965: Living in a Modern Way (for which I was the consulting curator) was able to research, document and exhibit the rich underpinnings of California’s Modernism in the 1930s and its post-World War II apotheosis facilitated by the region’s unprecedented population surge during the war years and the subsequent even greater demographic boom.

And PST enabled design historian Dave Hampton to create the extraordinary exhibition San Diego’s Craft Revolution: From Post-War Modern to California Design, a stunning celebration of creativity south of Los Angeles which, in spite of its awkward sub-title, is worth the trip to San Diego. Before I saw this beautifully designed show (twice) I knew a thing or two about craft in San Diego, then I found out that that was all I knew. Even about my long-time favorites Arline Fisch, Svetozar Radakovich and Barney Reid.

Fisch? Radakovich? Reid? “Overcompensation”? “Boosterish”?

Better to have said as I did, awe-struck, as I surveyed San Diego’s Craft Revolution: “Who knew?”

Bill Stern is director of the Museum of California Design.

Image: Svetozar Radakovich in collaboration with Carl Ekstrom, Double Door, ca. 1967, polyurethane foam, fiberglass and wood with resin. Photograph: Lynn Fayman.

Go to: www.culturalweekly.com




MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA DESIGN
In Pacific Standard Time



MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA DESIGN director Bill Stern
is consulting curator for the LACMA exhibition
CALIFORNIA DESIGN 1930-1965: LIVING IN A MODERN WAY

Sofa by A.Quincy Jones (1961), cocktail table by Milo Baughman (1950), and lamp by Zahara Schatz (1949) in the LACMA exhibition. Photograph: Michael Owen Baker, Daily News.

Curators: Wendy Kaplan, Bobbye Tigerman
Consulting Curator: Bill Stern

Exhibition design: Hodgetts + Fung

Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90036
ph 323.857.6000

www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/californiadesign

October 1, 2011 through March 25, 2012



COLLECTING EAMES:
THE JF CHEN COLLECTION

Photograph: Stefanie Keenan Photograph: Stefanie Keenan

MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA DESIGN board of directors member JOEL CHEN presents
COLLECTING EAMES: THE JF CHEN COLLECTION at:


JFCHEN
941 North Highland Ave.
LOS ANGELES,CA 90038
ph 323.466.9700

Curator: Daniel Ostroff
Installation design: Bob Breen and Clare Graham

www.jfchen.com

Monday, October 3rd, 2011 through Saturday, Janurary 14th, 2012

Mon-Fri: 10am to 4pm
Sat:11am to 4pm
Sun: CLOSED

Splash page









PAST EXHIBITIONS




A Marriage of Craft and Design:
The Work of Evelyn and Jerome Ackerman

Curated by Jo Lauria and Dale Carolyn Gluckman

Jerome Ackerman, vase and decanter
Jenev (Los Angeles),c. 1954, Stoneware
vase 8 in. x 2.25 in., decanter 16 in. x 2 1/2 in.

Evelyn Ackerman, tapestry, Network
Woven in Germany, c. 1970
Wool


Through May 8, 2011
Craft and Folk Art Museum
5814 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90036

www.cafam.org



Splash page