2010 Palm Spring Modernism Week

MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA DESIGN at

2010 is the seventh year that the Museum of California Design has participated in the Palm Springs Modernism Show. Since 2004 we have been represented by an information booth at which we announce our design shows and public programs and often by original boutique design exhibitions. Here are images from some of our recent installations:

Palm Springs Modernism Show
February 12, 13 and 14, 2010

Museum of California Design at 2010 Palm Springs Modernism Show
Photo: Museum of California Design

Our Information booth at the 2010 Palm Springs Modernism Show featured an exhibition of graphics created for our recent exhibitions and Award Benefits as well as information about the museum's future California Design exhibitions, public programs and awards.

This year's silent auction featured vintage design objects including Rudi Gernreich fashions and autographed architecture and design books, among them several by the late Julius Shulman.

We thank and Dolphin Promotions 

Museum of California Design at Palm Springs Modernism Show 2008 Left to right: Anatomy of a Murder: Saul Bass 1959; Santa Monica: Joe Molloy, 1984; Left to right: Tilt lounge chair, EM[CollaborativeStudio], Emannuel Cobbet and Mark Yeber, 2003; Puzzle chair, David Kawecki, 1989. Photograph: Museum of California Design

Museum of California Design at Palm Springs Modernism Show 2009
Mosaic panels and tapestry: Evelyn Ackerman 1950s.
Photograph: Museum of California Design

Palm Springs Art Museum
Sunday, February 21, 2010

Ornament is a Crime: A Conversation about Architectural Pottery which Brought California Modernism to Homes, Commercial Buildings and Gardens across the Country

Bill Stern, Executive Director of  the Museum of California Design and author of CALIFORNIA POTTERY: FROM MISSIONS TO MODERNISM,  in conversation with Bill Hertel, a former executive of Architectural Pottery the company that was founded  in 1950 to produce large-scale unornamented ceramic vessels for exterior and interior use. Whenever you see a tree or a plant in a white cylinder — in a home or an office building, or at a gasoline station anywhere in the United States — it is just one example of the legacy of Architectural Pottery’s revolutionary contributions to American design.

This event was sponsored by the Architecture and Design Council of the Palm Springs Art Museum.
Additional support was provided by 

Museum of California Design at Palm Springs Modernism Show 2007
Architectural Pottery: left, La Gardo Tackett; center: David Cressey; right, Marilyn Kay Austin; 1950s
Photograph: Courtesy of the Museum of California Design

 

Photo: Architectural Pottery Catalog 64, 1964
Collection: Museum of California Design
Photograph: Uncredited